Confused at a higher level

The view from Carleton College's physics department

More links

Posted by Arjendu on May 31, 2011

(a) ” a Georgetown University study of the class of 2010 at the country’s 193 most selective colleges [shows] … that [a]s entering freshmen, only 15 percent of students came from the bottom half of the income distribution. Sixty-seven percent came from the highest-earning fourth of the distribution. These statistics mean that on many campuses affluent students outnumber middle-class students.” More thoughts on this issue, and what Amherst with its giant endowment has done about it.

(b) “The economic value of a bachelor’s degree varies by college major. New data from the U.S. Census Bureau show that median earnings run from $29,000 for counseling-psychology majors to $120,000 for petroleum-engineering majors. “ An interactive graphic from the Chronicle.

(c) “But now all sorts of well-established, multiply confirmed findings have started to look increasingly uncertain. It’s as if our facts were losing their truth: claims that have been enshrined in textbooks are suddenly unprovable. This phenomenon doesn’t yet have an official name, but it’s occurring across a wide range of fields, from psychology to ecology.” Read more http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/12/13/101213fa_fact_lehrer

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2 Responses to “More links”

  1. Ken Wedding said

    Arjendu,

    Thanks for the references: the first is troubling and one that some of of from the Carleton class of ’67 have discussed. What are the numbers for Carleton? Do they correlate with the numbers of first-generation students or with rural/small town vs urban area students?

    And the New Yorker article is a great wake up call.

  2. Arjendu said

    Ken, it’s not easy for me to extract those numbers easily for Carleton and there are various reasons why it would not be appropriate to share them on a public blog even if I had access to such numbers (I’m not sure I’ve ever seen the numbers myself, honestly). If I ever got hold of such numbers, I am sure I know how to find you …

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